icon

Partnership w/ Fylpro

Learn More

icon

Cultivate Filipino Culture

Learn More

icon

Fylpro Alumni

Learn More

Latest Events

thumbnail
Events

ABS-CBN #SmilePH FYLPRO Teaser 2019

TFC The Filipino Channel and ABS-CBN #SmilePH was there with the 2018 FYLPRO Delegation and distinguished members of Philippine government,...

thumbnail
Events

Drive For Young Leaders Golf Tournament

The Philippine Consulate General in San Francisco, Filipino Young Leaders Program, and the Department of Foreign Affairs present. DRIVE FOR...

thumbnail
Immersion Program | Press Release |

Delegates selected for 2017 immersion program to the Philippines

Filipino Young Leaders Program Contact: Kit Zulueta (808) 291-9407 WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Philippine Embassy today announced the sixth cohort...

thumbnail
Press Release

FYLPRO alumni share experiences at Info Sessions, public invited

Two FYLPRO Info Sessions are scheduled this week for alumni to engage the public in meaning discussion as they share...

Facebook Feeds

The EDSA Revolution in the 1980s became the turning point for a couple of our delegates' #myFilAmstory.

Let's hear from Sergio Alcubilla today.

"February 20, 1986 is a date I’ll never forget. That evening, the sound of gunfire brought our house to a panic as we quickly rushed into the bathroom for safety. The next morning, we were told that my dad was killed by a communist hit-squad near our house.

Three months pregnant and with five young kids, my mom became a widow. With the shock of my dad’s death still fresh, she decided to take me with her to the US where she could work as a nurse. When it became too hard, she sent me to live with my aunt and she would give birth to my youngest brother alone. Later, my mom was able to save enough money to bring my siblings over and we were finally reunited.

My mom kept us together while her world fell apart. She worked multiple jobs to make sure we had what we needed. As a parent myself, I’m in awe with how my mom was able to raise 6 kids on her own in a new country. Her strong work ethic, determination, and resiliency not only allowed us to survive in the US but have laid the foundation for us to flourish."

Follow FYLPRO on FB and IG as Sergio embarks on his journey to bridge, represent, and discover.

“Those who fail to look back to where they came from will not reach where they're going.” - Dr. Jose P. Rizal

#MyFilAmStory
#USEmbassyPH
#phinUSA
#ayalafoundationinc
#knowhistoryknowself
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

FYLPRO

We asked our 2019 secretary, Major Char McGinnis, to share her Fil-Am story, but she decided to share a story about her experience this weekend.

“Thank you for your service.” I get this quite often especially around Veterans Day. 14 years of active duty service, I still cringe whenever I hear people say this to me, strangers and families alike. I didn’t know how to respond at first because to me I’m not a veteran yet and felt that my service was not purely borne out of patriotism but of rebellion. From the awkward, “you’re welcome” to how I answer now, “because you are worth it,” my responses took quite a journey.

But this weekend, someone said this to me and it made me teary-eyed. I approached a Filipino veteran from WWII to say thank you for his service and to give him a small token of appreciation. This was during the Congressional Gold Medal presentation, a recognition 77 years in the making. We accepted my grandfather’s medal on his behalf. As I shook his hand and said thank you, he immediately shot back with, “no, thank you for your service.” How could this hero say that to me? I have not experienced anything remotely close to what they did. I’ve never been in the trenches getting shot at by the enemy at close range. But I knew his “thank you for your service” meant something different, it meant “thank you for not letting our actions be in vain,” “thank you for representing our people and culture,” and “thank you for embracing who you are.” My small token of appreciation, a silver coin commemorating the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, paled compared to those words. Trying to fight back tears, my mouth uttered, "no, thank you for paving the way."

#MyFilAmStory is not at all unique, but it’s a story that needs to be heard. For our elders’ legacy, for the generations to come…"

#USEmbassyPH
#phinUSA
#ayalafoundationinc
#friendsalliespartners
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

3 days ago

FYLPRO

This Veterans Day, please don't forget to thank your lolos, lolas, titos, titas, tatays, nanays, and more for all the sacrifices they made to get you to where you are now.

Maraming salamat po!

AARP AAPI Community
Did you know that Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders have served in the United States military since the birth of our nation? This Veterans Day, we honor their service, sacrifice, and courage.

Today, over 65,000 Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders serve in the United States military. In fact, the story of AAPIs in service has been seen at every turn: at the birth of our nation, during the Civil War, in both World Wars, and current-day conflicts.

As they have answered the call to duty, we must answer ours. How can we honor all heroes, past and present? Let’s provide care for our AAPI veterans—tending to our wounded warriors, providing quality health care, and addressing their unique needs.

The AARP Family would like to say thank you to those who served. We appreciate your sacrifice, courage, and service. AARP has a lot of ways to repay the dedication veterans have shown, and to support their families. Learn more at www.aarp.org/veterans.

For More AAPI Stories:
Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/AARPAAPI
Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/AARPAAPI

Story Designed by NextDayBetter
#AAPI #caregiving #VeteransDay #Veterans
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

FYLPRO

Our last of the #MyFilAmStory that has roots from WWII.

The question, "what is your Fil-Am story?" drove delegate Kevin Zagala to learn more about his grandfather's story.

"This is my grandfather, Manuel R. Zagala Sr., at his US Navy enlistment ceremony.

Born June 17, 1933 in Sto. Tomas, Batangas, he & his family survived the Japanese occupation of WWII by abandoning their town and hiding in the hills surrounding Mt. Makiling.

At the age of 16, he decided to apply for the US Navy. As he was not of age at the time, he lied on his application, knowing that he would be of legal age by the time he arrived in the US. So at the tender age of 17 he served his 1st of 2 tours of duty in Vietnam as a Navy Seabee.

After his retirement, he returned to the Philippines with his family and obtained his BSN in Animal Husbandry at Araneta University through the GI Bill.

He utilized this degree to great effect, building a stable of cock fighting roosters numbering as high as 300 at one point. Story has it that Manny Pacquiao had attended a derby my grandfather was participating in and placed a bet on one of his roosters. That rooster took that fight and Pacquiao won one million pesos on that bet.

Unfortunately, my grandfather passed away earlier this year in April."

Follow FYLPRO on FB and IG as Kevin embarks on his journey to bridge, represent, and discover.

“Those who fail to look back to where they came from will not reach where they're going.” - Dr. Jose P. Rizal

#MyFilAmStory
#USEmbassyPH
#phinUSA
#ayalafoundationinc
#knowhistoryknowself
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

FYLPRO

Productive conversations on the Filipino American Tech Entrepreneur panel with fellow #FYLPRO Delegate Kevin Gabayan. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

FYLPRO

Continuing with this emerging theme of patriotism of our delegates' ancestors who made their Filipino-American stories possible.

Today, we give you Elle Ramel's #MyFilAmStory.

"After World War II, my Lolo, Alfred Ramel, was able to join the United States Military after helping US Soldiers in guerrilla resistance to the Japanese and in the early reconstruction. With a backpack and no shoes, he was able to jump on a Merchant Marines ship heading to Seattle and enlist. He faithfully served in the US Military for 21 years (1947-68) and very much viewed himself as a patriotic Filipino and an American. He came back to the Philippines to date and marry my grandmother, where she eventually immigrated to Chicago for him and bore four children, even with his international tours in France, Germany, Thailand and Burma. Posted at the National Guard in Joliet in the fifties, he was one of the first Filipinos to arrive in this region and helped to found the Filipino Friendship Society of Bolingbrook.

My grandfather died this year at the age of 94, but his quick thinking choice to jump on that boat paved the way for not only his immediate family to experience the American Dream here through educational and professional attainment, but to also send money and help home to help his younger siblings achieve their dreams in the Philippines. He was always about duty to his country and duty to his family. He taught me that there are always more opportunities to give back, and that to serve my country is one of its highest honor. Overall- my willingness to take risks and explore entrepreneurship comes from the instincts he helped instill in my father, and his patriotism underpins my desire to eventually serve in political office as a public servant. In his own words, “The wonderful thing about the American dream is you don’t have to be rich to get it. The dream is real.”

Follow FYLPRO on FB and IG as Elle embarks on her journey to bridge, represent, and discover.

“Those who fail to look back to where they came from will not reach where they're going.” - Dr. Jose P. Rizal

#myFilAmstory
#USEmbassyPH
#phinUSA
#ayalafoundationinc
#knowhistoryknowself
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

BE THE FIRST TO GET THE LATESTUPDATES & EVENTS

  • thumbnail
  • thumbnail
  • thumbnail